RP Photonics

Encyclopedia … combined with a great Buyer's Guide!

VLib
Virtual
Library

Laser Line Optics

Definition: optical elements made specifically for certain laser lines

Category: general optics

How to cite the article; suggest additional literature

Various kinds of optical components have been developed for use with specific laser lines. This has led to the term laser line optics, or more specifically to terms like laser line mirrors, laser line polarizers, etc.

Frequently, the restriction to certain operation wavelengths (more precisely, certain limited wavelength regions) arises from limitations of dielectric coatings, which intrinsically have wavelength-dependent reflection properties. For example, dielectric laser mirrors can achieve a high reflectivity (or some other defined reflectivity value, e.g. for beam splitters or output couplers) only in quite limited wavelength regions. The same holds for anti-reflection coatings and thin-film polarizers.

Although it is possible to make broadband coatings, which allow for substantially wider ranges of operation wavelength, those tend to be more complex and therefore more expensive. Further, narrowband coatings can exhibit a substantially better performance. Therefore, such coatings for narrow specific wavelength regions are often used when operation is anyway limited to such a region.

Certain wavelength restrictions also intrinsically apply to components like waveplates and birefringent tuners, further to various kinds of diffractive optics. Besides, there are certain optical filters, e.g. for blocking certain laser lines as required for applications like Raman spectroscopy.

Laser line optics are mostly available for a limited set of common laser wavelengths, for example:

They include components like laser mirrors, polarizers, waveplates, beam collimators, beam shapers, optical filters and optical windows.

See also: laser lines
and other articles in the category general optics

How do you rate this article?

Click here to send us your feedback!

Your general impression: don't know poor satisfactory good excellent
Technical quality: don't know poor satisfactory good excellent
Usefulness: don't know poor satisfactory good excellent
Readability: don't know poor satisfactory good excellent
Comments:

Found any errors? Suggestions for improvements? Do you know a better web page on this topic?

Spam protection: (enter the value of 5 + 8 in this field!)

If you want a response, you may leave your e-mail address in the comments field, or directly send an e-mail.

If you enter any personal data, this implies that you agree with storing it; we will use it only for the purpose of improving our website and possibly giving you a response; see also our declaration of data privacy.

If you like our website, you may also want to get our newsletters!

If you like this article, share it with your friends and colleagues, e.g. via social media:

arrow