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Why Are Large Mode Areas Problematic?

Posted on 2019-11-19 as a part of the Photonics Spotlight (available as e-mail newsletter!)

Permanent link: https://www.rp-photonics.com/spotlight_2019_11_19.html

Author: , RP Photonics Consulting GmbH

Abstract: It is explained why both large mode areas fibers and bulk laser resonators with large mode areas tend to be substantially less robust than others. The fundamental reason behind that is related to the reduced effect of diffraction. That also has implications for the power scaling of lasers.

Dr. Rüdiger Paschotta

There are certain typical cases where we need to use modes with a relatively large mode area:

Although the details of the physical effects determining the mode sizes in fibers and bulk laser resonators are quite different, a common experience is that devices with large mode areas tend to be less robust than others:

There has been a lot of work aiming at resolving such kind of trade-offs, but only with quite limited success. This is because the sensitivity of large modes of waveguides or resonators is high due to a relatively simple fundamental reason, which I explain in the following:

For those fundamental reasons, there has been only moderate success in terms of increased mode areas in recent years. One can make single-mode fibers with mode areas of a few thousand micrometers squared, but not much more, since the explained problems would become excessive. Similarly, mode areas of laser resonators cannot be arbitrarily extended.

Well, it does help to increase the resonator length, because that strengthens the effect of diffraction, but there are obviously practical limits to that. You may have noticed that high-power lasers, particularly those with high beam quality, require relatively long resonators. Here, it would be wrong to believe that the long length is behind the substantial alignment sensitivity; instead, things would get even worse when trying to make the resonator short (as needed e.g. for obtaining short pulse durations with Q switching).

Large Modes “See” More of Phase Profiles

There is actually another aspect to consider related to the sensitivity of large modes. For example, a focusing effect with a certain focal length can be described with a quadratic transverse phase change profile. Clearly, such a phase change will be more relevant to a large mode, simply because it “sees” more of the phase variation. Similarly, misalignment of a laser mirror can be described with a phase change which varies linearly e.g. with the x coordinate; the phase variation across a large beam is obviously larger than for a tightly focused beam.

Power Scaling is Limited by Resonator Properties

Based on these considerations, one can see that there is a fundamental limit to the power scalability of both fiber lasers and bulk lasers, as long as we require large modes for high beam quality. Although thin-disk lasers, for example, with impressive performance, with many kilowatts of output power combined with excellent beam quality, the limiting effects of laser resonators are already felt. So it is not only a matter of developing even better thin-disk laser heads; the fundamental limits of resonators remain, and there is unfortunately little which we can do about that. For even higher powers with high beam quality, one may then have to go for beam combining with multiple lasers.


This article is a posting of the Photonics Spotlight, authored by Dr. Rüdiger Paschotta. You may link to this page and cite it, because its location is permanent. See also the RP Photonics Encyclopedia.

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